Zero Police Motorcycles Join De Anza’s Fleet

Posted on: November 4th, 2013 by Road Rider MCA No Comments


Keep your eyes peeled next time you’re in Downtown San Jose and you might catch a quick glimpse of a live Zero DS Police Motorcycle in action. In fact, everyday there are more areas where you’re likely to encounter a Zero Police Motorcycle – ┬ájust don’t expect to hear it coming.

Santa Cruz-based Zero Motorcycles continues to be a major force in the fuel-cell revolution, in part due to the growing success of their Zero DS Police Motorcycle. The Foothill-De Anza College Police Department is the newest local PD to pick up a few Zero DSs for their fleet, following moves by the San Jose State University Police Department and the police departments of Scotts Valley, San Mateo, and Santa Cruz to integrate DSs into their fleets earlier this year. Farther afield, the Police Motorcycle has even found work in the Hong Kong and Bogota Police Departments.

As SJSU knows, a college campus is the ideal environment for the Zero patrol bike’s advantages to shine. The emission-free and soft humming motor is stealthy when silence is a tactical advantage, and it’s well-mannered amidst crowds. Zeros can be used to quietly patrol the many narrow pathways and trails often found on college campuses, as well as other pedestrian areas. In cities, police departments are finding that maneuverability, silence, and the low-profile social nature of their Zeros allows them to improve their current patrols and creates possibilities for patrolling new areas while also meeting goals for emissions reductions.

Zero Police Motorcycles are based on the 2013 Zero S (street) and Zero DS (dual sport) model motorcycles, and have an approximate range of up to 121 miles on a single charge with a maximum speed of 95 mph. Designed to meet the specialized needs of police and security patrols, the police edition offers a wide range of customizable options.

Check out more information on the Zero Police Motorcyle at www.zeromotorcycles.com/fleet.


 

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